zaterdag 23 mei 2020

George Formby - Isle of man (January 1936) (Regal MR 1932 mtx OAR 3769) (78rpm)

George Formby, (born George Hoy Booth; 26 May 1904 – 6 March 1961), was an English actor, singer-songwriter and comedian who became known to a worldwide audience through his films of the 1930s and 1940s. On stage, screen and record he sang light, comical songs, usually playing the ukulele or banjolele, and became the UK's highest-paid entertainer.
Born in Wigan, Lancashire, he was the son of George Formby Sr, from whom he later took his stage name. After an early career as a stable boy and jockey, Formby took to the music hall stage after the early death of his father in 1921. His early performances were taken exclusively from his father's act, including the same songs, jokes and characters.

In 1923 he made two career-changing decisions – he purchased a ukulele, and married Beryl Ingham, a fellow performer who became his manager and transformed his act. She insisted that he appear on stage formally dressed, and introduced the ukulele to his performance. He started his recording career in 1926 and, from 1934, he increasingly worked in film to develop into a major star by the late 1930s and 1940s, and became the UK's most popular entertainer during those decades.

George Formby - Isle of man


 

BBC Dance Orch. (Henry Hall) & Val Rosing - The sun has got his hat on (1932) (Columbia CB 472 mtx CA 12815) (78rpm)

"The Sun Has Got His Hat On" is a song by Noel Gay and Ralph Butler. It is known for its appearance in the 1985 version of the musical Me and My Girl, and was originally recorded in 1932 by two popular UK dance bands – Ambrose and his Orchestra, with vocals by Sam Browne, and by the Henry Hall BBC Dance Orchestra with vocals by Val Rosing.


BBC Dance Orch. (Henry Hall) & Val Rosing - The sun has got his hat on


 

 

 

vrijdag 1 mei 2020

Flanagan & Allen - The washing on the Siegfriedline (03 May 1943) (Decca F. 7265 mtx DR.3895 B) (78rpm)

Flanagan and Allen were a British singing and comedy double act popular during the 1930s and 1940s. Its members were Bud Flanagan (1896 – 1968, otherwise Chaim Weintrop) and Chesney Allen (1894 – 1982).[1] They were first paired in a Florrie Forde revue, and were booked by Val Parnell to appear at the Holborn Empire in 1929.
Flanagan and Allen's songs featured the same, usually gentle, humour for which the duo were known in their live performances, and during the Second World War they reflected the experiences of ordinary people during wartime. Songs such as "We're Going to Hang out the Washing on the Siegfried Line" mocked the German defences (Siegfried Line), while others including "Miss You" sang of missing one's sweetheart during enforced absences.
 
We're gonna hang out the washing on the Siegfried line
Have you any dirty washing, mother dear?
We're gonna hang out the washing on the Siegfried line
‘Cause the washing day is here.

Whether the weather may be wet or fine
We'll just ride along without a care
We're gonna hang out the washing on the Siegfried line
If that Siegfried line's still there

Mother dear, I'm writing you from somewhere in France
Hoping this finds you well.
Sergeant says I'm doing fine - a soldier and a half
Here's a song that we all sing
This'll make you laugh...

We're gonna hang out the washing on the Siegfried line
Have you any dirty washing, mother dear?
We're gonna hang out the washing on the Siegfried line
‘Cause the washing day is here.

Whether the weather may be wet or fine
We'll just ride along without a care
We're gonna hang out the washing on the Siegfried line
If that Siegfried line's still there

Whether the weather may be wet or fine
We'll just ride along without a care
We're gonna hang out the washing on the Siegfried line
If that Siegfried line's still there

Flanagan & Allen - The washing on the Siegfriedline


 





 




 
 

Mary Martin & son Larry & Mitch Miller Orchestra - Get out those old records (1950) (Columbia 39115 mtx CO 44693) (78rpm)


Mary Virginia Martin (December 1, 1913 – November 3, 1990) was an American actress, singer, and Broadway star. A muse of Rodgers and Hammerstein, she originated many leading roles over her career including Nellie Forbush in South Pacific (1949) and Maria von Trapp in The Sound of Music (1959). She was named a Kennedy Center Honoree in 1989. She was the mother of actor Larry Hagman.

Mary Martin & son Larry & Mitch Miller Orchestra - Get out those old records

zaterdag 18 april 2020

Ambrose & His Orchestra & Jack Cooper - I'm in a dancing mood (1936) (Decca 971 A mtx TB 2350) (78rpm)

Bert Ambrose's major discovery in the years leading up to the war was the singer Vera Lynn (b. 1917), who sang with his band from 1937 to 1940 and, during the war, became known as the "Forces' Sweetheart". Lynn married Harry Lewis, a clarinettist in the band, in 1939. Other singers with the Ambrose band included Sam Browne, Elsie Carlisle, Denny Dennis, who recorded a number of duets with Vera Lynn, Max Bacon (also the band's drummer), Evelyn Dall, and Anne Shelton, with whom "When That Man Is Dead And Gone", a jibe at Adolf Hitler, written by Irving Berlin, was recorded in 1941. Ambrose's signature tune was "When Day Is Done".

 
Ambrose & His Orchestra & Jack Cooper - I'm in a dancing mood


maandag 30 maart 2020

Elsie & Doris Waters - Knees up mother Brown (1940) (Decca F. 7309 mtx DR.4178 B) (78rpm)

Elsie Waters and Doris Waters were a British music hall and radio comedy duo who played the characters of Gert and Daisy. They were most popular from the 1930's through to the 1950's and at the height of their fame they were considered as big as Morecambe & Wise. The sisters retired to Steyning, West Sussex, England.

Elsie & Doris Waters - Knees up mother Brown


vrijdag 20 maart 2020

Jack Payne & The BBC Dance Orch - Say it with music (Londen 27 January 1931) (Columbia CB240 mtx WA 11029) (78rpm)

John Wesley Vivian "Jack" Payne (22 August 1899 – 4 December 1969) was a British dance music bandleader who established his reputation during the British dance band era of the 1930s.
He played with visiting American jazz bands at the Birmingham Palais during the early 1920s, including the Southern Rag-a-Jazz Orchestra in 1922, before moving to London in 1925. He played in a ten-piece band which became the house band at London's Hotel Cecil in 1925. This ensemble regularly performed on the BBC in the latter half of the decade. In 1928, Payne became the BBC Director of Dance Music and the leader of the BBC's first official dance band. In 1929 the band was featured in the first ever BBC television broadcast. His signature tune was Say it With Music written by Irving Berlin.

Jack Payne & The BBC Dance Orch - Say it with music